SAVING SPECIES

Basking Shark © Andrew Pearson.

Saving species is our action to protect shark species or populations threatened with extinction.

This can involve:

  • Advocating for international protection
  • Engaging with wildlife conservation and trade bodies
  • Monitoring implementation and promoting enforcement of conservation commitments
  • Supporting appropriate spatial management initiatives (marine protected areas)
  • Developing conservation plans and driving research to address data gaps
  • Developing and sharing codes of practice and educational materials

Over the years we’ve helped to secure protection for several species in the NE Atlantic. These include:

  • Basking Shark
  • Porbeagle
  • White Skate
  • Common Skate
  • Angelshark

We maintain a “watching brief” on these species. Monitoring implementation of legislation and fisheries practice. And providing  up to date codes of conduct for stakeholders. Such as our Basking Shark Code of Conduct and Fisheries Advisories.

The most recent IUCN Red List analysis shows that around 24% of shark and ray species are threatened. It also highlights the extreme vulnerability of flat sharks and rays. For this reason, we're now working on collaborative Angelshark and Sawfish programmes.


CURRENT PROJECTS:

Angelshark © Tom Young.  

ANGELSHARK PROJECT

The slow growth and demersal nature of angel sharks leaves them especially vulnerable to inshore fishing activities, consequently many species in this family have suffered steep population declines and now face a significant risk of extinction.

Angelshark Project


Green Sawfish © Doug Perrine.  

SAWFISH PROJECT

Over the past century populations of all five species of sawfish have declined drastically and they are no longer found across much of their former range - the only reliable strongholds are now in Florida and northern Australia. 

Sawfish Project



RELATED LINKS:

Find out about our other areas of work:

Transforming Fisheries

Citizen Science

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